From physical changes like hot flashes to emotional challenges such as mood swings, menopause brings on many unwelcome symptoms. Some women find that these issues are manageable with home treatments and lifestyle management alone. But if you’re among the many women who find that menopause is disruptive to your quality of life, you could be a good candidate for hormone replacement therapy.

What Is Hormone Replacement Therapy?

Hormone replacement therapy (or “HRT,” and also known as simply “hormone therapy”), is a treatment for symptoms of menopause. As you approach menopause, your ovaries’ production of the hormone estrogen begins to slow down. While this change in your reproductive system is a normal part of aging, it brings a host of unpleasant symptoms, including:

  • Night sweats
  • Irregular periods
  • Vaginal dryness and painful intercourse
  • Hot flashes
  • Mood changes, which may include depression and irritability
  • Sleep difficulties
  • Urinary changes, which could include incontinence

The goal of HRT is to replace the estrogen your body is no longer producing in order to alleviate these symptoms.

Types of Hormone Replacement Therapy

HRT can be prescribed as an estrogen-only medication (ET), or as a combination treatment with both estrogen and progestogen (EPT). You may receive ET if you’ve had your uterus removed during a hysterectomy. The addition of progestogen is given to women who still have their uterus, to reduce the risk of endometrial cancer that may be increased when using estrogen alone.

There are two ways HRT can be administered: systemically, in which the medication travels through your entire body, or locally (to target vaginal symptoms, for instance). Examples of systemic HRT include pills, injections, and patches, while local treatments include vaginal creams and rings.

Are You a Good Candidate for HRT?

Before beginning HRT, many women first try lifestyle modifications to manage their menopause symptoms. Wearing layered clothing, sleeping in cotton sheets, and avoiding spicy foods and alcohol could limit hot flashes, for instance. Some women also see improvements by taking supplements to support healthy hormone function. But if these approaches don’t give you adequate relief, it’s worth discussing HRT with your provider, especially when symptoms begin interfering with your routine.

What exactly does that mean? It can look different from one person to the next, but an example could be hot flashes that make it difficult to get through the day or keep you up at night. Likewise, decreased libido and painful intercourse are symptoms that should be addressed. And if you’re struggling with any other issues that could be attributed to menopause, from mood changes to weight gain, it’s possible that HRT could alleviate these issues, too.

If you’re ready to have a conversation about HRT, we’ll help assess your candidacy for the treatment. Talking to a caring specialist is particularly important, as, like most medications, HRT isn’t risk-free. Women tend to see the best results when starting HRT within ten years of menopause, and risks of the treatment are lowest among the younger women. Similar to birth control, ET and EPT can increase the risk of blood clots, though it’s rare in women aged 50 to 59. The risk of breast cancer is also increased with five or more years of EPT, but there was no increased risk with ET alone. Your provider can help you weigh these factors and assess your individual risk profile when determining if HRT is right for you.

Interested in Starting Hormone Replacement Therapy? Schedule an Appointment Today

Starting HRT can be a safe and effective way to manage your menopause symptoms, but it’s a decision that calls for guidance from a medical expert. If you’d like to talk through your options with our care team, call (404) 352-2850 or schedule an appointment online.

Drs. Lynley S. Durrett and Obiamaka Mora receive this peer-driven honor

Two physicians from Avant Gynecology appear on the Atlanta’s Top Doctors list in the January issue of Modern Luxury Medicine + Doctors magazine and in the April issue of The Atlantan magazine. Drs. Lynley S. Durrett and Obiamaka Mora receive the honor, which annually recognizes notable physicians among the area’s healthcare landscape.

“This award is a testament to the dedication we have for our community,” says Dr. Lynley Durrett. “We aim to create a space where women can feel safe and know they are receiving optimal care throughout all stages of their lives.”

Modern Luxury Medicine + Doctors and The Atlantan magazines use a database of top doctors compiled by Castle Connolly Medical Ltd., an established healthcare research company based in New York. Each physician included is chosen through peer nomination, research, and a stringent vetting process. The publications feature 1,732 Top Doctors and 51 Rising Stars representing the following counties: Bartow, Bibb, Cherokee, Clarke, Clayton, Cobb, Coweta, Dawson, DeKalb, Douglas, Fayette, Floyd, Forsyth, Fulton, Greene, Gwinnett, Hall, Henry, Newton, Oconee, Paulding, Pickens, Rockdale, and Spalding.

To schedule an appointment call 404-352-2850 or visit AvantGynecology.com.

Dr. Lynley S. Durrett is board certified in obstetrics and gynecology and is a fellow of the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (FACOG). Durrett’s professional expertise includes minimally invasive and robotic surgery techniques with interests in vaginal prolapse treatment, pelvic reconstructive surgery, symptomatic fibroid management, endometriosis management, managing urologic conditions, and bio-identical hormone replacement therapy. Dr. Durrett has been selected by her peers every year as one of Atlanta magazine’s “Top Docs” since 2010.

Dr. Obiamaka Mora is board certified in the practice of Obstetrics and Gynecology and a fellow of the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (FACOG). Her professional expertise includes minimally invasive and robotic surgery techniques with interests in pelvic reconstructive surgery, symptomatic fibroid management, endometriosis management, and bio-identical hormone replacement therapy. Dr. Mora is a member of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), the American Medical Association (AMA), the American Association of Gynecologic Laparoscopists (AAGL), and the Georgia OB/GYN Society.

Avant Gynecology provides exceptional, compassionate care to women at every stage of their lives while staying at the forefront of knowledge and skill in the fields of women’s health and gynecologic surgery. The practice’s physicians offer a full range of contraceptive options; specialized services such as bio-identical hormone therapy, hormone pellets, and ThermiVa vaginal rejuvenation; as well as minimally invasive and robot-assisted surgical procedures. Serving generations of women for more than 40 years, Avant Gynecology serves patients at Piedmont Hospital in Buckhead. Go to AvantGynecology.com for daily updates.

Interviews are available upon request.

When it comes to period pain, it can be tough to say what’s normal. Researchers have only just begun to unravel the complex mystery of pain tolerance, and we’ve recently learned that there are biological and psychosocial factors involved with each person’s experience with pain. Still, understanding how your individual period pain stacks up against typical cramping can help us determine whether there’s another, underlying issue. If your periods are debilitatingly painful, here’s what you should know.

Period Pain: What’s Normal & What’s Not?

“Experiencing some pain during your period is considered normal,” assures Dr. Obiamaka Mora.  Each cycle, your uterus sheds its lining. And to assist in this body-cleansing process, surrounding tissues release prostaglandins: hormone-like substances that trigger muscle contractions. For some women, these contractions are simply bothersome, while for others, the pain may be so intense that it interferes with day-to-day activities.

In general, symptoms of menstrual cramps include:

  • Throbbing or cramping pain in the abdominal region ranging from mild to intense
  • Discomfort that begins one to three days before your period and ends within two to three days after your period starts
  • A dull, persistent ache
  • Discomfort that radiates to the lower back

“The challenge here is that terms like ‘severe’ and ‘intense’ aren’t universally defined,” says Dr. Mora; “each person’s pain tolerance is different, so it’s impossible to say what menstrual cramps ‘should’ feel like.” While more than half of women experience at least some period pain, only some women experience pain so severe that it interferes with normal activities for several days each cycle. If you fall into this camp, it’s probably time to seek help. Missing out on multiple days of your routine each month can be disruptive at best, but more importantly, no one should have to live in pain.

What Can Cause Severe Period Pain?

Normal levels of pain caused by your menstrual cycle is known as primary dysmenorrhea. But there are several reproductive conditions that can make period pain more intense in what’s known as secondary dysmenorrhea, including:

For some women, periods will unfortunately just be more painful than they are for others. But when painful periods are caused by an underlying factor, your gynecologist can help.

How Can a Gynecologist Help with Period Pain?

Sometimes, self-care measures like hot baths and heating pads are enough to alleviate period pain. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) also bring relief, and can reduce the amount of prostaglandins your uterus produces, thereby minimizing cramping.

But if these approaches aren’t enough to alleviate your pain, talk to your gynecologist. We can discuss symptoms with you, and perform a pelvic exam or medical imaging to see if an underlying issue is present. Sometimes, hormonal birth control can be used to alleviate intense period pain. In other cases, there may be conditions requiring treatment, such as surgery to remove uterine fibroids.

Schedule a Women’s Health Appointment For Period Pain Today

Are painful periods stopping you in your tracks each month? If so, Avant Gynecology is here to help with personalized women’s health services. To schedule an appointment, call 404-352-2850 or send us a message online.

Since the earliest cases of HIV were reported in the 1980s, advancements in medicine have made it possible for people who are HIV positive to lead long and fulfilling lives. HIV is still a life-altering disease. however; so understanding how it impacts your body will help you manage it successfully. Here’s a closer look at the relationship between HIV and women’s health.

How HIV Affects Women’s Reproductive Health

Research points to a correlation between being HIV positive and certain gynecological issues. For one, women who are HIV positive may experience more severe symptoms from STDs such as genital herpes and pelvic inflammatory disease. Other gynecological conditions, including bacterial vaginosis and yeast infections, are also more common in people with HIV. Frustratingly, because HIV impacts your immune system, these conditions can be more challenging to treat if you’re HIV positive.

For some women, HIV can also cause menstrual cycle abnormalities. There’s some evidence to suggest that the tissue in your reproductive system experiences HIV-related changes, which can lead women who are HIV positive to experience missed periods.

Though planning for pregnancy can become challenging when your cycle becomes inconsistent, if you’re HIV positive and trying to get pregnant, it’s still possible to conceive and maintain a healthy pregnancy. You may be a good candidate for fertility treatments if your period is irregular, so speak with your provider before trying to conceive. There are also steps you can take during and after pregnancy to greatly reduce the risk of transmitting HIV to your baby. In fact, the risk is reduced to just one percent for women who continue taking HIV medications, avoid breastfeeding, and have a C-section birth.

The Link Between HIV & Other Diseases

While heart disease is the leading cause of death for all women in the U.S., the risk is even greater among women living with HIV. Experts haven’t yet established why people with HIV are more likely to get heart disease, but one suspected cause is body-wide inflammation — a hallmark characteristic of HIV. Still, there are lifestyle changes you can make to reduce your risk of heart disease: eat plenty of wholesome foods, exercise regularly, and avoid smoking.

Being HIV positive is also associated with an elevated risk of cervical cancer. The disease that causes cervical cancer, human papillomavirus (HPV) is more prevalent in women with HIV. The good news is that advancements like Pap tests and the HPV vaccine have made cervical cancer almost entirely preventable. If you haven’t already received your HPV vaccine, talk to your provider about getting it, and be sure to continue going for Pap tests regularly.

HIV’s Impact on Aging

While medicine has afforded HIV positive women a longer lifespan, the caveat is that they’re likely to experience some of the less pleasant aspects of aging — and they may be more intense. Menopause and osteoporosis are issues for all women to watch for, but women with HIV sometimes experience them earlier. Symptoms of menopause, such as hot flashes, can also be more severe. Since menopause causes a decrease in estrogen (a hormone that supports immune function), it’s critical to continue following your medication regimen as you age. Bone loss also may be accelerated if you have HIV, which is compounded by the fact that certain HIV drugs have an increased risk of osteoporosis.

If you have HIV, it’s important to take care of all aspects of your health. Avant Gynecology is here to support you with comprehensive women’s health services. To schedule an appointment, call 404-352-2850 or send us a message online.

Like every part of your body, your bladder experiences natural changes as you age. But intimidating issues like incontinence or infections aren’t inevitable. In many cases, these problems can be reduced or prevented with some simple lifestyle changes.

We always advise making an appointment to investigate persistent bladder issues, but here are some ways you can start prioritizing bladder health now.

Try Pelvic Floor Exercises

Pelvic floor exercises can prevent or control bladder issues like urinary incontinence. The pelvic floor is a muscle group that supports several important organs, including your bladder, uterus, and small intestine. Like other muscle groups, your pelvic floor can be strengthened with regular exercise. Try a combination of Kegels, squats, and bridges for better urinary health now, and to prevent issues like pelvic floor prolapse down the road.

Choose Cotton

Undergarments made of nylon and other synesthetic materials may be more likely to trap moisture, which can invite bacteria. Since UTIs are usually caused by bacteria, breathable fabrics are best. You can’t go wrong with cotton — this soft, absorbent fabric promotes airflow to keep moisture at bay.

Pee After Sex

Even when using protection, sometimes intercourse can introduce bacteria into your urinary system. One simple way to flush it out is to urinate after having sex. While this isn’t a foolproof way to prevent UTIs altogether, many women who practice the habit report that it’s helpful.

Empty Your Bladder Fully

It can be tempting to rush your bathroom break and get back to your day quickly, but doing so can backfire. “Stopping your urine stream too soon allows it to make its way back into the bladder,” explains Dr. Obiamaka Mora, “where it can introduce bacteria.” Even when you think you’re done, give yourself several seconds to make sure your bladder is truly empty.

Watch How You Wipe

Again, it all comes down to bacteria. Wiping from back to front exposes your urethra to bacteria like E. coli, so always wipe from front to back after a bowel movement or urinating.

Stay Active

In addition to pelvic floor exercises, other types of physical activity could help to strengthen your bladder. The American Urological Association recommends low-impact exercises like yoga, bicycling, and swimming, which can tone your core and minimize bladder pressure. Be cautious about the physical activity you focus on to protect your bladder, however, as heavy lifting and high-impact exercises (like jumping), could put excess pressure on the organ, and may also be more likely to cause leakage.

Stay Hydrated

Staying hydrated keeps your bladder healthy by diluting urine and clearing out bacteria. Aim for at least 50 ounces of water daily, and feel free to add cranberry juice into your rotation. While it won’t cure an existing UTI, cranberry juice can prevent E. coli bacteria from taking hold and causing an infection in the first place.

Avoid Smoking

You already know that smoking sharply increases your risk of lung cancer, but it’s also linked to an increased risk of bladder cancer. In fact, up to 50% of bladder tumors are attributed to smoking. Nonsmokers should continue to steer clear of it, while current smokers can find quitting resources through the American Lung Association.

Know When to Get Help

If your bladder issues are interfering with your quality of life, it’s time to talk to your gynecologist and health provider. An overactive bladder, for instance, can lead to the accidental release of urine, frequent urination, and a sudden need to urinate that may be difficult to control. Fortunately, there are several effective treatments available for this and other bladder issues.

Our experts are well-versed in diagnosing and treating bladder issues, so don’t hesitate to contact our team with any bathroom troubles. We can help pinpoint the cause(s) of incontinence or other bladder issues and develop a treatment plan to best fit your needs. To schedule an appointment, call 404-352-2850 or arrange one online.

Drs. Lynley S. Durrett and Obiamaka Mora from Avant Gynecology made an appearance on “The Weekly Check-up”, a healthcare talk radio show, aired on September 10 on 95.5 WSB, Atlanta’s News & Talk. Alongside host Ashley Frasca, they delved into crucial topics like annual exams, menopause, abnormal menstrual cycles, hormone therapy options, and more.

As board-certified specialists in obstetrics and gynecology, Drs. Durrett and Mora shared insights into the most frequent reasons patients end up in their operating rooms. These typically include issues like abnormal bleeding, fibroids, endometriosis, adenomyosis, polyps, or leakage problems. They stressed the importance of regular consultations with your gynecologist, as these visits can detect cervical changes that may require treatment, potentially avoiding the need for surgery.

Fibroids, in particular, have become increasingly prevalent among women. Dr. Mora highlighted that one in four women are affected by fibroids. These growths originate from a single muscle cell in the uterus that undergoes excessive growth, forming knots. Although fibroids can lead to pain or bleeding, many women experience no symptoms at all.

“A lot of times when Dr. Durrett and I have diagnosed ladies with fibroids; they didn’t necessarily have specific symptoms other than detecting their uterus was enlarged during a pelvic exam,” explained Dr. Mora. “It doesn’t necessarily mean that if you have them something needs to be done. But it’s important to keep track of them.”

Annual check-ups were stressed as essential in avoiding critical health problems. Dr. Mora stated, “We’ve seen cases where women come in with many enlarged fibroids and we start to run out of minimally invasive options that would have been available if they came in sooner.”

A vital component of routine health check-ups is the mammogram, a screening procedure that plays a crucial role in detecting breast cancer at an early stage. Drs. Durrett and Mora highly recommend that women make an appointment for a mammogram at the age of 40. Dr. Mora expanded on this point, highlighting a positive trend in healthcare coverage. She stated, “Most insurance companies are now providing coverage for annual mammograms. Many if not all insurance providers have expanded their coverage to include pap smears as well.”

Incontinence was another common concern discussed during the show. Avant Gynecology offers in-office testing, including a detailed questionnaire and physical examination, to identify the suitable treatments.

“A lot of people are embarrassed to ask about this, so we try to bring it up because we don’t want people to think that leakage is normal. Even when you get older it’s not normal to have leakage issues,” said Dr. Mora.

During the show, the physicians responded to callers’ questions regarding menstrual cycles, the appropriate age to take daughters to the gynecologist, and the necessity of pap smears after a hysterectomy. Dr. Durrett recommended that girls see a gynecologist by age 18 or when they become sexually active. However, if a teenager exhibits irregular menstrual cycle issues, an earlier gynecology visit may be warranted.

“It’s common for the first couple of years of menstruation to have irregular cycles. However, if your daughter’s periods are excessive and causing her to pass out or miss school due to pain, it’s important for them to see a gynecologist,” said Dr. Durrett.

Hormone therapies, especially for managing menopausal symptoms, have gained popularity over the years. Many women find these therapies effective for alleviating hot flashes, night sweats, vaginal dryness, and mood changes. Dr. Mora explained, “Menopause is almost the same as if you are going through puberty. You are experiencing similar changes. Are they normal? Yes. Is it something that can kill someone? No. But if it’s something that is significantly affecting your life, it is important that it be addressed.”

For women experiencing menopausal symptoms, hormone pellets have become a convenient option. These rice grain-sized pellets provide medication delivery without the need for daily administration. Dr. Durrett noted, “It’s especially beneficial for post-hysterectomy patients. However, it’s crucial to maintain regular follow-ups and lab tests when using hormone pellets.”

Dr. Durrett and Dr. Mora talked about robotic surgeries, mammograms, and reiterated the significance of yearly exams and preventive care. Dr. Durrett concluded, “Establishing a relationship with a regular physician is so important. While many patients come in with their own concerns, your regular doctor may notice changes you haven’t. With a consistent physician-patient relationship, you’re more likely to receive personalized, high-quality care.”

Listen to the show below to learn more about these and other topics. To schedule an appointment with an expert gynecologist at Avant Gynecology, call 404-352-2850.

Gynecological cancers are those that affect the female reproductive system. Certain types (such as cervical cancer) are more common than others, so there tends to be greater awareness about them.

In honor of Gynecological Cancer Awareness Month this September, we’re spreading the word about two lesser-known gynecological cancers: granulosa cell tumors and thecoma.

What Are Granulosa Cell Tumors?

A granulosa cell tumor (GCT) is a type of mass that develops in your ovary. These tumors tend to be slow-growing and can develop at any age, including during childhood, but the average age for diagnosis is 50. GCTs are uncommon, accounting for just 5% of all ovarian tumors.

While GCTs are typically cancerous, they’re often detected early, when treatment outcomes are favorable. Symptoms of GCTs can include abnormal menstrual cycles, including triggering early puberty in young girls or bleeding after menopause. Breast soreness and abdominal swelling may also occur.

Because GCTs develop in your ovaries — the organs responsible for producing estrogen — they often lead to abnormally high estrogen levels. As with many types of cancer, the root cause of GCTs is still largely unknown. Oftentimes, people who develop this cancer have a mutation in a specific gene, FOXL2, which may allow the tumors to develop.

The majority of GCTs are caught and diagnosed when the cancer is contained only in the ovaries (Stage 1). “Typically, treatment involves the removal of the tumor while attempting to keep remaining healthy tissue intact,” says Dr. Lynley Durrett. “Though complete removal of your ovaries may be recommended if you aren’t planning to have children in the future.” For GCTs that have spread beyond the ovaries, further treatment may be recommended, such as radiation, hormone therapy, or chemotherapy.

What Is Thecoma?

Ovarian thecomas are similar to GCTs in that they share several symptoms, and are also considered rare. Representing just .05 to 1% of ovarian tumors, thecomas are masses that develop in your ovaries. Like GCTs, they can cause an increase in estrogen and may lead to abnormal bleeding. The majority of these tumors are diagnosed in postmenopausal women.

While many thecomas are benign (noncancerous), cancerous thecomas can occasionally occur. A fifth of patients diagnosed with a thecoma may also develop endometrial carcinoma, a common form of uterine cancer. For this reason, and to address the uncomfortable symptoms they can produce, thecomas are typically removed using the same approach as GCTs. If you are past childbearing years or don’t wish to become pregnant, your gynecologist may recommend removing your ovaries entirely. If you’re diagnosed with a thecoma and wish to preserve your fertility, removal of the tumor alone may be possible.]

While both of these gynecological cancers are rare, others are less so. Any time you experience unfamiliar symptoms that could indicate a reproductive health issue, such as persistent or uncommon pelvic pain, or abnormal bleeding, don’t hesitate to schedule an appointment with one of our providers beyond your regularly scheduled Pap smear. There are many possible causes of these symptoms, and our team can get to the bottom of them through diagnostic measures like blood panels and imaging tests.

Whether you’re due for your annual exam or you have something you’d like to discuss with our team, schedule an appointment online or by calling (404) 352-2850.

From puberty through menopause, it can feel as if your hormones are always fluctuating. And in truth, thanks to factors like sleep, digestion, and stress, they are indeed surging and dropping every day.

But in addition to these normal fluctuations, changes like pregnancy and aging can also alter hormone levels significantly, leading to noticeable (and often frustrating) symptoms. In honor of National Women’s Day on August 9th, here’s what you should know about how hormonal changes can affect you.

Hormones in Your Body

Hormones are the chemicals in your body produced by glands in your endocrine system. Once they’re released into your bloodstream, they act as messengers to regulate functions throughout your body, eliciting specific reactions to maintain your health. The endocrine system produces at least 50 known hormones, but estrogen and progesterone are two specific to women that change significantly throughout your lifespan and lead to the most noteworthy symptoms.

How Hormones Change with Age

Many phases of a woman’s life are defined by hormone levels. For example, hormones are responsible for regulating your menstrual cycle, starting during puberty and ending once you go through menopause.

Each cycle, your hormones can trigger a host of uncomfortable symptoms that fall under the umbrella term premenstrual syndrome (PMS), including anxiety, bloating, constipation, headaches, mood changes, and cramping. Hormone levels also manifest in pronounced changes during pregnancy, breastfeeding, and menopause.

Hormone Imbalances Signs & Causes

“With so many hormones in your body and so many important jobs for them to do, it’s possible that something can go awry with these generally friendly chemical messengers,” says Dr. Obiamaka Mora. The potential causes for these changes span far and wide, from autoimmune conditions to stress and certain medications.

A hormonal imbalance is diagnosed when there’s too little or too much of a specific hormone present. Even a minor variation in levels can produce symptoms. For example, you could have a hormone imbalance if you have:

  • Irregular periods
  • Brain fog
  • Gastrointestinal distress
  • Mood changes
  • Vaginal dryness
  • Changes in libido
  • Infertility
  • Weight fluctuations

There are many other possible symptoms that may indicate a hormonal imbalance, however. Some of these are temporary — such as those experienced during pregnancy and menopause —  while others are chronic. The good news is that no matter the root cause, there are ways to control the effects of hormone changes, and your gynecologist can aid you in getting to the bottom of the issue.

Navigating Hormonal Changes

Identifying the best way to address the symptoms of your hormonal changes will depend on several factors, including their root cause and severity. For example, when it comes to treating PMS, lifestyle changes like stress management and taking supplemental vitamins could be enough to manage your hormone fluctuations effectively. For more severe symptoms, prescription medications like hormonal birth control or antidepressants may be in order.

During Pregnancy

In all of these cases, collaborating with your gynecologist can help find solutions. But addressing hormone changes during pregnancy especially calls for direct involvement with your obstetrician, as it’s important to make sure any treatments you pursue are safe for you and your growing baby. Eating well, getting regular exercise and ample sleep, plus stress reducing measures like massage and yoga can help manage both the physical and emotional toll of hormone changes during pregnancy.

During Menopause

Menopause can trigger an especially difficult range of symptoms. During this natural stage of life, your ovaries stop producing most of their estrogen, which not only ceases your menstrual cycle but can lead to issues like vaginal dryness, breast tenderness, night sweats, sleep challenges, and hot flashes, to name a few.

Sometimes, treating symptoms individually can be effective. Using a lubricant can prevent uncomfortable sex, for instance, while therapy and other stress relieving tactics can help with mood changes. But if menopause begins to negatively impact your overall quality of life, there’s no need to suffer through. Your gynecologist can discuss treatment to control your symptoms and deliver relief.

If you’re concerned about a possible hormone imbalance, allow our compassionate team to help. Our providers can discuss symptoms and individualized approaches to help you feel your best, so schedule an appointment online or call us directly at 404-352-2850.

Drs. Lynley S. Durrett and Obiamaka Mora appear in Atlanta magazine’s July issue

Two physicians from Avant Gynecology rank among metro Atlanta’s Top Doctors in Atlanta magazine’s July issue. Avant Gynecology physicians consistently appear on the list, which annually honors notable physicians among the area’s healthcare landscape. This year’s list features Drs. Lynley S. Durrett and Obiamaka Mora.

Atlanta magazine creates its list from a roster of doctors selected by Professional Research Service (PRS). More than 1,000 physicians appear on the publication’s 2023 list. These doctors represent the following counties in Georgia: Carroll, Cherokee, Clayton, Cobb, Coweta, DeKalb, Douglas, Fayette, Forsyth, Fulton, Gwinnett, Hall, Henry, and Rockdale. PRS creates its list by conducting an online peer-review survey of physicians in the metro Atlanta area. Physicians are asked to nominate fellow physicians they deem the best in their field of practice. Many votes were cast honoring excellence in all fields of medicine. The featured doctors were screened and selected through the verification of licensing and review of any infractions through applicable boards, agencies, and rating services.

“We have an unwavering dedication to our patients, providing the best possible women’s health services we can,” says Dr. Lynley Durrett. “We believe this recognition is a testament to that, and it inspires us to continue to take our commitment to the next level.”

To schedule an appointment call 404-352-2850 or visit AvantGynecology.com.

Dr. Lynley S. Durrett is board certified in obstetrics and gynecology and is a fellow of the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (FACOG). Durrett’s professional expertise includes minimally invasive and robotic surgery techniques with interests in vaginal prolapse treatment, pelvic reconstructive surgery, symptomatic fibroid management, endometriosis management, managing urologic conditions, and bio-identical hormone replacement therapy. Dr. Durrett has been selected by her peers every year as one of Atlanta magazine’s Top Doctors since 2010.

Dr. Obiamaka Mora is board certified in the practice of obstetrics and gynecology and a fellow of the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (FACOG). Her professional expertise includes minimally invasive and robotic surgery techniques with interests in pelvic reconstructive surgery, symptomatic fibroid management, endometriosis management, and bio-identical hormone replacement therapy. Dr. Mora is a member of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), the American Medical Association (AMA), the American Association of Gynecologic Laparoscopists (AAGL), and the Georgia OB/GYN Society.

Avant Gynecology provides exceptional, compassionate care to women at every stage of their lives while staying at the forefront of knowledge and skill in the fields of women’s health and gynecologic surgery. The practice’s physicians offer a full range of contraceptive options; specialized services such as bio-identical hormone therapy, hormone pellets, and ThermiVa vaginal rejuvenation; as well as minimally invasive and robot-assisted surgical procedures. Serving generations of women for more than 40 years, Avant Gynecology serves patients at Piedmont Hospital in Buckhead. Go to AvantGynecology.com for daily updates.

Interviews are available upon request.

Drs. Lynley S. Durrett and Obiamaka Mora receive this peer-driven honor

Two physicians from Avant Gynecology appear on the Atlanta’s Top Doctors list in the January issue of Modern Luxury Medicine + Doctors magazine and in the April issue of The Atlantan magazine. Drs. Lynley S. Durrett and Obiamaka Mora receive the honor, which annually recognizes notable physicians among the area’s healthcare landscape.

“Our compassion for our patients and our desire to offer exceptional care remain at the forefront of our mission,” says Dr. Lynley Durrett. “Receiving recognitions such as this one is a sign we’re meeting our goals and inspires us to go even further.”

Modern Luxury Medicine + Doctors and The Atlantan magazines use a database of top doctors compiled by Castle Connolly Medical Ltd., an established healthcare research company based in New York. Each physician included is chosen through peer nomination, research, and a stringent vetting process. The publications feature 1,371 Top Doctors and 44 Rising Stars representing the following counties: Bartow, Bibb, Cherokee, Clarke, Clayton, Cobb, Coweta, Dawson, DeKalb, Douglas, Fayette, Floyd, Forsyth, Fulton, Greene, Gwinnett, Hall, Henry, Newton, Oconee, Paulding, Pickens, Rockdale, and Spalding.

To schedule an appointment call 404-352-2850 or visit AvantGynecology.com

Dr. Lynley S. Durrett is board certified in obstetrics and gynecology and is a fellow of the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (FACOG). Durrett’s professional expertise includes minimally invasive and robotic surgery techniques with interests in vaginal prolapse treatment, pelvic reconstructive surgery, symptomatic fibroid management, endometriosis management, managing urologic conditions, and bio-identical hormone replacement therapy. Dr. Durrett has been selected by her peers every year as one of Atlanta magazine’s “Top Docs” since 2010.

Dr. Obiamaka Mora is board certified in the practice of Obstetrics and Gynecology and a fellow of the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (FACOG). Her professional expertise includes minimally invasive and robotic surgery techniques with interests in pelvic reconstructive surgery, symptomatic fibroid management, endometriosis management, and bio-identical hormone replacement therapy. Dr. Mora is a member of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), the American Medical Association (AMA), the American Association of Gynecologic Laparoscopists (AAGL), and the Georgia OB/GYN Society.

Avant Gynecology provides exceptional, compassionate care to women at every stage of their lives while staying at the forefront of knowledge and skill in the fields of women’s health and gynecologic surgery. The practice’s physicians offer a full range of contraceptive options; specialized services such as bio-identical hormone therapy, hormone pellets, and ThermiVa vaginal rejuvenation; as well as minimally invasive and robot-assisted surgical procedures. Serving generations of women for more than 40 years, Avant Gynecology serves patients at Piedmont Hospital in Buckhead. Go to AvantGynecology.com for daily updates.

Interviews are available upon request.